Vegetable oils, plantaardige oliën; from left ...

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natural coloring

Commercial source: Typically vegetable, sometimes animal (insect).
Used in: beverages, dry mixes, confections, processed foods, ice cream, margarine, baked goods, cereal, pasta.
Examples: annatto, turmeric, paprika, beet, carmine, cochineal.
Definition: An additive usually extracted from plant sources which imparts color to foods and beverages which naturally have those colors.
Typically Vegan

natural flavor

Commercial source: animal (meat, fish, fowl, eggs, or dairy), or vegetable.
Used in: processed foods, beverages, cereals, salad dressing, condiments, baked goods.
Definition: An additive derived from plant or animal sources which imparts flavor.
May Be Non-Vegetarian

niacin

Also known as: nicotinic acid, nicotin-amide, niacinamide, vitamin B-3.
Commercial source: synthetic.
Exists in: liver, yeast, meat, legumes, whole cereals.
Used in: prepared breakfast and baby cereals, peanut butter, enriched foods.
Definition: A B vitamin which is important in the normal functioning of the nervous system.
Typically Vegan

nonnutritive sweetener

Commercial source: synthetic.
Used in: dietetic foods, soft drinks, candy, chewing gum, toothpaste, yogurt.
Examples: saccharin, acesulfame K.
Definition: An artificial sweetener possessing practically no calories.
Vegan

norbixin

See annatto.

Nutrasweet

See aspartame.

nutritional yeast

Commercial source: fungal.
Used as: flavor, cheese substitute, source of vitamin B-12.
Definition: Inactivated yeast used as a source of protein and vitamins, especially B vitamins.
Vegan

Production information: Red Star Yeast & Products, a major manufacturer of nutritional yeast, reports that no cow bone filter was used in the processing of the molasses used in their growth media. Red Star Vegetarian Support Formula, previously known as T-6635+ yeast powder, is a source of vitamin B-12.

nutritive sweetener

Commercial source: vegetable, animal (insect), or synthetic.
Examples: dextrose, fructose, sucrose, corn syrup, molasses, honey, aspartame.
Definition: Sweeteners which yield more than two calories per gram.
Typically Vegan

  

oil

See fat.

oleic acid

Also known as: cis-9-octadecenoic acid.
Commercial source: Typically animal (cow- or -hog-derived).
Exists in: many plants and animals, and in synthetic form.
Used in: beverages, ice cream, confections, baked goods.
Definition: A component of some fats which may be used as a flavoring or binder in foods.
Typically Non-Vegetarian

Production information: Witco Corp., a major manufacturer of oleic acid, reports that the principal source of oleic acid is cow- or hog-derived. Witco produces a kosher variety which is a uniquely vegetable-based blend of oils.

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oleoresin

Commercial source: vegetable.
Used in: dry mixes, seasonings, processed foods.
Definition: A concentrated spice or herb extract used as a flavor and/or color enhancer.
Vegan

Copyright Information

Olestra

Also known as: Olean, sucrose polyester.
Commercial source: synthetic (vegetable). The sucrose used to make it may have been filtered through a cow bone filter if the sucrose was derived from sugar cane.
Used in: potato chips, tortilla chips, crackers, cheese puffs.
Definition: A no-calorie fat substitute.
May Be Non-Vegetarian

Production information: Proctor and Gamble Co., the creator and producer of Olestra, reports that they use vegetable oils and table sugar to synthesize it. I was unable to determine the source of their table sugar.

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oxidizing agent

Example: hydrogen peroxide.
Definition: An additive which destroys or deactivates undesirable components or contaminants in foods. 

oil

See fat.

oleic acid

Also known as: cis-9-octadecenoic acid.
Commercial source: Typically animal (cow- or -hog-derived).
Exists in: many plants and animals, and in synthetic form.
Used in: beverages, ice cream, confections, baked goods.
Definition: A component of some fats which may be used as a flavoring or binder in foods.
Typically Non-Vegetarian

Production information: Witco Corp., a major manufacturer of oleic acid, reports that the principal source of oleic acid is cow- or hog-derived. Witco produces a kosher variety which is a uniquely vegetable-based blend of oils.

oleoresin

Commercial source: vegetable.
Used in: dry mixes, seasonings, processed foods.
Definition: A concentrated spice or herb extract used as a flavor and/or color enhancer.
Vegan

Olestra

Also known as: Olean, sucrose polyester.
Commercial source: synthetic (vegetable). The sucrose used to make it may have been filtered through a cow bone filter if the sucrose was derived from sugar cane.
Used in: potato chips, tortilla chips, crackers, cheese puffs.
Definition: A no-calorie fat substitute.
May Be Non-Vegetarian

Production information: Proctor and Gamble Co., the creator and producer of Olestra, reports that they use vegetable oils and table sugar to synthesize it. We were unable to determine the source of their table sugar.

oxidizing agent

Example: hydrogen peroxide.
Definition: An additive which destroys or deactivates undesirable components or contaminants in foods.